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Kingsmere Parcel KM4

Middleton Stoney Rd, Bicester

Bovis Homes

113 new homes

North Urbanism & NBA

Available to move 2015

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Bovis Homes have planned an attractive, sustainable development of 113 new homes situated within the wider Kingsmere development to the south of Bicester Town Centre. Parcel KM4 plays an important role in connecting parcels KM1 (to the west by Taylor Wimpey) and KM3 (to the south, also by Bovis) and defining open space to the east and north. It includes a new 'gateway' at the entrance to the scheme in tandem with development in KM3 and an open space containing a children's play area.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

Parcel KM4 in context.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

Parcel KM4 in context.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

The Kingsmere development lies on the southern edge of Bicester.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

The Kingsmere development lies on the southern edge of Bicester.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

Parcel KM4 is part of the Kingsmere development which lies on the southern edge of Bicester.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

Parcel KM4 is part of the Kingsmere development which lies on the southern edge of Bicester.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

1. Connections

Parcel KM4 Block Layout

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

1. Connections

Parcel KM4 Block Layout

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

1. Connections

The relationship of the wider Kingsmere development to Bicester.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

1. Connections

The relationship of the wider Kingsmere development to Bicester.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

1. Connections

The entrance to the scheme from the 'Gateway' on the secondary street to the south - looking west

The entrance to the scheme from the 'Gateway' on the secondary street to the south - looking west

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

1. Connections

The entrance to the scheme from the 'Gateway' on the secondary street to the south - looking west

The entrance to the scheme from the 'Gateway' on the secondary street to the south - looking west

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

2. Facilities and services

The relationship to existing facilities in Bicester.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

2. Facilities and services

The relationship to existing facilities in Bicester.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

2. Facilities and services

Pedestrian access points and isochrones

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

2. Facilities and services

Pedestrian access points and isochrones

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

2. Facilities and services

Strategic connections within and around Bicester

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

2. Facilities and services

Strategic connections within and around Bicester

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

3. Public transport

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

3. Public transport

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

4. Meeting local housing requirements

Site layout showing the location of private and affordable housing.

Integrating
into the neighbourhood

4. Meeting local housing requirements

Site layout showing the location of private and affordable housing.

Creating a Place

5. Character

Variations in house types, their grouping, arrangement and use of building materials are proposed throughout the site to create character.

The combination of proposed building materials and architectural details will create character within the parcel in addition to the Block / Street / Townscape strategy. The aim is to transition from a ‘formal’ character on the southern edge of the parcel - along the Secondary Street - to a more ‘informal’ character on the outer edges of the parcel - facing open space. The central space within the parcel is intended to have a ‘semi formal’ character - being a mix of informal materials / details on a more formal group of dwellings.

The side street leading into the parcel and east-west across it will be more formal in appearance as will the secondary street. Similarly, the mews route leading north across the parcel will be ‘formal’ - although on a slightly smaller scale than the secondary street. Dwelling types will be repeated along the secondary street, side streets and mews to create a more formal character - although they will be arranged in groups with some variation to avoid an overly repetitious response.

The principle building materials proposed for the secondary street / sides streets / mews will be red brick as a main facing material with stone and off-white render used for contrast / emphasis in important locations - as per the materials / townscape plan. Roof coverings will typically include ‘slates’ and ‘tiles’ in grey or red shades. Details will typically include gauged brick arches with brick cills or stone headers and cills. As a general rule, ‘formal’ development will have flat top door canopies and flat top dormers where these are present on 2.5 storey dwellings.

The ‘gateway’ space on the secondary street will be a ‘formal’ arrangement of dwellings and apartments which will unify development at this location in parcels KM3 (to the south) and KM4. Stone and off-white cement render will be introduced here as a contrasting material to red brick. Architectural details will be more formal and will include dressed stone quoins and string courses on marker buildings.

Development on the lanes (the northern and eastern edges of parcel KM4) is intended to be more informal in appearance and character. In broad terms this will include variations in dwelling type, scale and arrangement of houses - including some that are linked with habitable accommodation above driveways / access to garages. The overall impression will be one of development that has evolved more organically over time - in contrast to the more formal streets which should look as though they were planned and built as one.

In terms of details, informal development on the lanes will include red and buff brick, off-white cement render and stone as main facing materials. Roof coverings will be mix of tiles in a variety of grey and red shades. Door canopies will be pitched, as will dormers where these are present. Red brick detailing will be used around door and window openings to reflect that seen in the character assessment. Arched headers will be more common in tandem with brick cills. Stone headers and cills will also be used, but these will be simple and informal in appearance.

Creating a Place

5. Character

Variations in house types, their grouping, arrangement and use of building materials are proposed throughout the site to create character.

The combination of proposed building materials and architectural details will create character within the parcel in addition to the Block / Street / Townscape strategy. The aim is to transition from a ‘formal’ character on the southern edge of the parcel - along the Secondary Street - to a more ‘informal’ character on the outer edges of the parcel - facing open space. The central space within the parcel is intended to have a ‘semi formal’ character - being a mix of informal materials / details on a more formal group of dwellings.

The side street leading into the parcel and east-west across it will be more formal in appearance as will the secondary street. Similarly, the mews route leading north across the parcel will be ‘formal’ - although on a slightly smaller scale than the secondary street. Dwelling types will be repeated along the secondary street, side streets and mews to create a more formal character - although they will be arranged in groups with some variation to avoid an overly repetitious response.

The principle building materials proposed for the secondary street / sides streets / mews will be red brick as a main facing material with stone and off-white render used for contrast / emphasis in important locations - as per the materials / townscape plan. Roof coverings will typically include ‘slates’ and ‘tiles’ in grey or red shades. Details will typically include gauged brick arches with brick cills or stone headers and cills. As a general rule, ‘formal’ development will have flat top door canopies and flat top dormers where these are present on 2.5 storey dwellings.

The ‘gateway’ space on the secondary street will be a ‘formal’ arrangement of dwellings and apartments which will unify development at this location in parcels KM3 (to the south) and KM4. Stone and off-white cement render will be introduced here as a contrasting material to red brick. Architectural details will be more formal and will include dressed stone quoins and string courses on marker buildings.

Development on the lanes (the northern and eastern edges of parcel KM4) is intended to be more informal in appearance and character. In broad terms this will include variations in dwelling type, scale and arrangement of houses - including some that are linked with habitable accommodation above driveways / access to garages. The overall impression will be one of development that has evolved more organically over time - in contrast to the more formal streets which should look as though they were planned and built as one.

In terms of details, informal development on the lanes will include red and buff brick, off-white cement render and stone as main facing materials. Roof coverings will be mix of tiles in a variety of grey and red shades. Door canopies will be pitched, as will dormers where these are present. Red brick detailing will be used around door and window openings to reflect that seen in the character assessment. Arched headers will be more common in tandem with brick cills. Stone headers and cills will also be used, but these will be simple and informal in appearance.

Creating a Place

5. Character

The relationship with adjacent parcels was considered.

The combination of proposed building materials and architectural details will create character within the parcel in addition to the Block / Street / Townscape strategy. The aim is to transition from a ‘formal’ character on the southern edge of the parcel - along the Secondary Street - to a more ‘informal’ character on the outer edges of the parcel - facing open space. The central space within the parcel is intended to have a ‘semi formal’ character - being a mix of informal materials / details on a more formal group of dwellings.

The side street leading into the parcel and east-west across it will be more formal in appearance as will the secondary street. Similarly, the mews route leading north across the parcel will be ‘formal’ - although on a slightly smaller scale than the secondary street. Dwelling types will be repeated along the secondary street, side streets and mews to create a more formal character - although they will be arranged in groups with some variation to avoid an overly repetitious response.

The principle building materials proposed for the secondary street / sides streets / mews will be red brick as a main facing material with stone and off-white render used for contrast / emphasis in important locations - as per the materials / townscape plan. Roof coverings will typically include ‘slates’ and ‘tiles’ in grey or red shades. Details will typically include gauged brick arches with brick cills or stone headers and cills. As a general rule, ‘formal’ development will have flat top door canopies and flat top dormers where these are present on 2.5 storey dwellings.

The ‘gateway’ space on the secondary street will be a ‘formal’ arrangement of dwellings and apartments which will unify development at this location in parcels KM3 (to the south) and KM4. Stone and off-white cement render will be introduced here as a contrasting material to red brick. Architectural details will be more formal and will include dressed stone quoins and string courses on marker buildings.

Development on the lanes (the northern and eastern edges of parcel KM4) is intended to be more informal in appearance and character. In broad terms this will include variations in dwelling type, scale and arrangement of houses - including some that are linked with habitable accommodation above driveways / access to garages. The overall impression will be one of development that has evolved more organically over time - in contrast to the more formal streets which should look as though they were planned and built as one.

In terms of details, informal development on the lanes will include red and buff brick, off-white cement render and stone as main facing materials. Roof coverings will be mix of tiles in a variety of grey and red shades. Door canopies will be pitched, as will dormers where these are present. Red brick detailing will be used around door and window openings to reflect that seen in the character assessment. Arched headers will be more common in tandem with brick cills. Stone headers and cills will also be used, but these will be simple and informal in appearance.

Creating a Place

5. Character

The relationship with adjacent parcels was considered.

The combination of proposed building materials and architectural details will create character within the parcel in addition to the Block / Street / Townscape strategy. The aim is to transition from a ‘formal’ character on the southern edge of the parcel - along the Secondary Street - to a more ‘informal’ character on the outer edges of the parcel - facing open space. The central space within the parcel is intended to have a ‘semi formal’ character - being a mix of informal materials / details on a more formal group of dwellings.

The side street leading into the parcel and east-west across it will be more formal in appearance as will the secondary street. Similarly, the mews route leading north across the parcel will be ‘formal’ - although on a slightly smaller scale than the secondary street. Dwelling types will be repeated along the secondary street, side streets and mews to create a more formal character - although they will be arranged in groups with some variation to avoid an overly repetitious response.

The principle building materials proposed for the secondary street / sides streets / mews will be red brick as a main facing material with stone and off-white render used for contrast / emphasis in important locations - as per the materials / townscape plan. Roof coverings will typically include ‘slates’ and ‘tiles’ in grey or red shades. Details will typically include gauged brick arches with brick cills or stone headers and cills. As a general rule, ‘formal’ development will have flat top door canopies and flat top dormers where these are present on 2.5 storey dwellings.

The ‘gateway’ space on the secondary street will be a ‘formal’ arrangement of dwellings and apartments which will unify development at this location in parcels KM3 (to the south) and KM4. Stone and off-white cement render will be introduced here as a contrasting material to red brick. Architectural details will be more formal and will include dressed stone quoins and string courses on marker buildings.

Development on the lanes (the northern and eastern edges of parcel KM4) is intended to be more informal in appearance and character. In broad terms this will include variations in dwelling type, scale and arrangement of houses - including some that are linked with habitable accommodation above driveways / access to garages. The overall impression will be one of development that has evolved more organically over time - in contrast to the more formal streets which should look as though they were planned and built as one.

In terms of details, informal development on the lanes will include red and buff brick, off-white cement render and stone as main facing materials. Roof coverings will be mix of tiles in a variety of grey and red shades. Door canopies will be pitched, as will dormers where these are present. Red brick detailing will be used around door and window openings to reflect that seen in the character assessment. Arched headers will be more common in tandem with brick cills. Stone headers and cills will also be used, but these will be simple and informal in appearance.

Creating a Place

5. Character

A more formal response in the 'Gateway' on the secondary street to the south of Parcel KM4 - in tandem with development opposite to the south.

The combination of proposed building materials and architectural details will create character within the parcel in addition to the Block / Street / Townscape strategy. The aim is to transition from a ‘formal’ character on the southern edge of the parcel - along the Secondary Street - to a more ‘informal’ character on the outer edges of the parcel - facing open space. The central space within the parcel is intended to have a ‘semi formal’ character - being a mix of informal materials / details on a more formal group of dwellings.

The side street leading into the parcel and east-west across it will be more formal in appearance as will the secondary street. Similarly, the mews route leading north across the parcel will be ‘formal’ - although on a slightly smaller scale than the secondary street. Dwelling types will be repeated along the secondary street, side streets and mews to create a more formal character - although they will be arranged in groups with some variation to avoid an overly repetitious response.

The principle building materials proposed for the secondary street / sides streets / mews will be red brick as a main facing material with stone and off-white render used for contrast / emphasis in important locations - as per the materials / townscape plan. Roof coverings will typically include ‘slates’ and ‘tiles’ in grey or red shades. Details will typically include gauged brick arches with brick cills or stone headers and cills. As a general rule, ‘formal’ development will have flat top door canopies and flat top dormers where these are present on 2.5 storey dwellings.

The ‘gateway’ space on the secondary street will be a ‘formal’ arrangement of dwellings and apartments which will unify development at this location in parcels KM3 (to the south) and KM4. Stone and off-white cement render will be introduced here as a contrasting material to red brick. Architectural details will be more formal and will include dressed stone quoins and string courses on marker buildings.

Development on the lanes (the northern and eastern edges of parcel KM4) is intended to be more informal in appearance and character. In broad terms this will include variations in dwelling type, scale and arrangement of houses - including some that are linked with habitable accommodation above driveways / access to garages. The overall impression will be one of development that has evolved more organically over time - in contrast to the more formal streets which should look as though they were planned and built as one.

In terms of details, informal development on the lanes will include red and buff brick, off-white cement render and stone as main facing materials. Roof coverings will be mix of tiles in a variety of grey and red shades. Door canopies will be pitched, as will dormers where these are present. Red brick detailing will be used around door and window openings to reflect that seen in the character assessment. Arched headers will be more common in tandem with brick cills. Stone headers and cills will also be used, but these will be simple and informal in appearance.

Creating a Place

5. Character

A more formal response in the 'Gateway' on the secondary street to the south of Parcel KM4 - in tandem with development opposite to the south.

The combination of proposed building materials and architectural details will create character within the parcel in addition to the Block / Street / Townscape strategy. The aim is to transition from a ‘formal’ character on the southern edge of the parcel - along the Secondary Street - to a more ‘informal’ character on the outer edges of the parcel - facing open space. The central space within the parcel is intended to have a ‘semi formal’ character - being a mix of informal materials / details on a more formal group of dwellings.

The side street leading into the parcel and east-west across it will be more formal in appearance as will the secondary street. Similarly, the mews route leading north across the parcel will be ‘formal’ - although on a slightly smaller scale than the secondary street. Dwelling types will be repeated along the secondary street, side streets and mews to create a more formal character - although they will be arranged in groups with some variation to avoid an overly repetitious response.

The principle building materials proposed for the secondary street / sides streets / mews will be red brick as a main facing material with stone and off-white render used for contrast / emphasis in important locations - as per the materials / townscape plan. Roof coverings will typically include ‘slates’ and ‘tiles’ in grey or red shades. Details will typically include gauged brick arches with brick cills or stone headers and cills. As a general rule, ‘formal’ development will have flat top door canopies and flat top dormers where these are present on 2.5 storey dwellings.

The ‘gateway’ space on the secondary street will be a ‘formal’ arrangement of dwellings and apartments which will unify development at this location in parcels KM3 (to the south) and KM4. Stone and off-white cement render will be introduced here as a contrasting material to red brick. Architectural details will be more formal and will include dressed stone quoins and string courses on marker buildings.

Development on the lanes (the northern and eastern edges of parcel KM4) is intended to be more informal in appearance and character. In broad terms this will include variations in dwelling type, scale and arrangement of houses - including some that are linked with habitable accommodation above driveways / access to garages. The overall impression will be one of development that has evolved more organically over time - in contrast to the more formal streets which should look as though they were planned and built as one.

In terms of details, informal development on the lanes will include red and buff brick, off-white cement render and stone as main facing materials. Roof coverings will be mix of tiles in a variety of grey and red shades. Door canopies will be pitched, as will dormers where these are present. Red brick detailing will be used around door and window openings to reflect that seen in the character assessment. Arched headers will be more common in tandem with brick cills. Stone headers and cills will also be used, but these will be simple and informal in appearance.

Creating a Place

5. Character

The architectural response in the centre of the parcel was designed to reflect the existing character of development in villages surrounding Bicester.

The combination of proposed building materials and architectural details will create character within the parcel in addition to the Block / Street / Townscape strategy. The aim is to transition from a ‘formal’ character on the southern edge of the parcel - along the Secondary Street - to a more ‘informal’ character on the outer edges of the parcel - facing open space. The central space within the parcel is intended to have a ‘semi formal’ character - being a mix of informal materials / details on a more formal group of dwellings.

The side street leading into the parcel and east-west across it will be more formal in appearance as will the secondary street. Similarly, the mews route leading north across the parcel will be ‘formal’ - although on a slightly smaller scale than the secondary street. Dwelling types will be repeated along the secondary street, side streets and mews to create a more formal character - although they will be arranged in groups with some variation to avoid an overly repetitious response.

The principle building materials proposed for the secondary street / sides streets / mews will be red brick as a main facing material with stone and off-white render used for contrast / emphasis in important locations - as per the materials / townscape plan. Roof coverings will typically include ‘slates’ and ‘tiles’ in grey or red shades. Details will typically include gauged brick arches with brick cills or stone headers and cills. As a general rule, ‘formal’ development will have flat top door canopies and flat top dormers where these are present on 2.5 storey dwellings.

The ‘gateway’ space on the secondary street will be a ‘formal’ arrangement of dwellings and apartments which will unify development at this location in parcels KM3 (to the south) and KM4. Stone and off-white cement render will be introduced here as a contrasting material to red brick. Architectural details will be more formal and will include dressed stone quoins and string courses on marker buildings.

Development on the lanes (the northern and eastern edges of parcel KM4) is intended to be more informal in appearance and character. In broad terms this will include variations in dwelling type, scale and arrangement of houses - including some that are linked with habitable accommodation above driveways / access to garages. The overall impression will be one of development that has evolved more organically over time - in contrast to the more formal streets which should look as though they were planned and built as one.

In terms of details, informal development on the lanes will include red and buff brick, off-white cement render and stone as main facing materials. Roof coverings will be mix of tiles in a variety of grey and red shades. Door canopies will be pitched, as will dormers where these are present. Red brick detailing will be used around door and window openings to reflect that seen in the character assessment. Arched headers will be more common in tandem with brick cills. Stone headers and cills will also be used, but these will be simple and informal in appearance.

Creating a Place

5. Character

The architectural response in the centre of the parcel was designed to reflect the existing character of development in villages surrounding Bicester.

The combination of proposed building materials and architectural details will create character within the parcel in addition to the Block / Street / Townscape strategy. The aim is to transition from a ‘formal’ character on the southern edge of the parcel - along the Secondary Street - to a more ‘informal’ character on the outer edges of the parcel - facing open space. The central space within the parcel is intended to have a ‘semi formal’ character - being a mix of informal materials / details on a more formal group of dwellings.

The side street leading into the parcel and east-west across it will be more formal in appearance as will the secondary street. Similarly, the mews route leading north across the parcel will be ‘formal’ - although on a slightly smaller scale than the secondary street. Dwelling types will be repeated along the secondary street, side streets and mews to create a more formal character - although they will be arranged in groups with some variation to avoid an overly repetitious response.

The principle building materials proposed for the secondary street / sides streets / mews will be red brick as a main facing material with stone and off-white render used for contrast / emphasis in important locations - as per the materials / townscape plan. Roof coverings will typically include ‘slates’ and ‘tiles’ in grey or red shades. Details will typically include gauged brick arches with brick cills or stone headers and cills. As a general rule, ‘formal’ development will have flat top door canopies and flat top dormers where these are present on 2.5 storey dwellings.

The ‘gateway’ space on the secondary street will be a ‘formal’ arrangement of dwellings and apartments which will unify development at this location in parcels KM3 (to the south) and KM4. Stone and off-white cement render will be introduced here as a contrasting material to red brick. Architectural details will be more formal and will include dressed stone quoins and string courses on marker buildings.

Development on the lanes (the northern and eastern edges of parcel KM4) is intended to be more informal in appearance and character. In broad terms this will include variations in dwelling type, scale and arrangement of houses - including some that are linked with habitable accommodation above driveways / access to garages. The overall impression will be one of development that has evolved more organically over time - in contrast to the more formal streets which should look as though they were planned and built as one.

In terms of details, informal development on the lanes will include red and buff brick, off-white cement render and stone as main facing materials. Roof coverings will be mix of tiles in a variety of grey and red shades. Door canopies will be pitched, as will dormers where these are present. Red brick detailing will be used around door and window openings to reflect that seen in the character assessment. Arched headers will be more common in tandem with brick cills. Stone headers and cills will also be used, but these will be simple and informal in appearance.

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

5. Character

Creating a Place

6. Working with the site and context

Views into and out of the site are carefully optimised.

Creating a Place

6. Working with the site and context

Views into and out of the site are carefully optimised.

Creating a Place

6. Working with the site and context

Landmark buildings provide orientation and character.

Creating a Place

6. Working with the site and context

Landmark buildings provide orientation and character.

Creating a Place

6. Working with the site and context

The site was greenfield with no existing structures.

Creating a Place

6. Working with the site and context

The site was greenfield with no existing structures.

Creating a Place

7. Creating well defined streets and spaces

Building facades and massing reflects the street hierarchy.

Creating a Place

7. Creating well defined streets and spaces

Building facades and massing reflects the street hierarchy.

Creating a Place

7. Creating well defined streets and spaces

The arrangement of dwellings along streets follows the guidance in the Design Code for secondary streets, side streets, mews, lanes and private drives.

Creating a Place

7. Creating well defined streets and spaces

The arrangement of dwellings along streets follows the guidance in the Design Code for secondary streets, side streets, mews, lanes and private drives.

Creating a Place

7. Creating well defined streets and spaces

Corner buildings have lots of windows and landscaping, allowing for an engaging streetscape.

Creating a Place

7. Creating well defined streets and spaces

Corner buildings have lots of windows and landscaping, allowing for an engaging streetscape.

Creating a Place

8. Easy to find your way around

Streets and open spaces follow an intuitive hierarchy.

Creating a Place

8. Easy to find your way around

Streets and open spaces follow an intuitive hierarchy.

Creating a Place

8. Easy to find your way around

Creating a Place

8. Easy to find your way around

Street & Home

9. Streets for all

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9. Streets for all

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9. Streets for all

Streets are short and the layout creates a series of 'T' junctions with vista termination (marker buildings) forcing drivers to slow down. The Gateway is a raised table at the entrance to the scheme from the secondary street (which is a traditional highwa

Street & Home

9. Streets for all

Streets are short and the layout creates a series of 'T' junctions with vista termination (marker buildings) forcing drivers to slow down. The Gateway is a raised table at the entrance to the scheme from the secondary street (which is a traditional highwa

Street & Home

9. Streets for all

The Gateway is a raised table at the entrance to the scheme from the secondary street (which is a traditional highway design with a kerb). From here, all streets are shared surfaces.

Street & Home

9. Streets for all

The Gateway is a raised table at the entrance to the scheme from the secondary street (which is a traditional highway design with a kerb). From here, all streets are shared surfaces.

Street & Home

9. Streets for all

The parking strategy comprises a mix of on plot (to side or front) rear courtyard and on street solutions as per various good practice guides and the design code itself. As a general rule no more than 4 spaces are grouped together along streets.

Street & Home

9. Streets for all

The parking strategy comprises a mix of on plot (to side or front) rear courtyard and on street solutions as per various good practice guides and the design code itself. As a general rule no more than 4 spaces are grouped together along streets.

Street & Home

10. Car parking

On plot parking strategy

Street & Home

10. Car parking

On plot parking strategy

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10. Car parking

Off plot, on street and garage parking strategy

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10. Car parking

Off plot, on street and garage parking strategy

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The LAP will be used by toddlers and young children. It will be implemented by Bovis with management by CDC / management co.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The LAP will be used by toddlers and young children. It will be implemented by Bovis with management by CDC / management co.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The LAP will be used by toddlers and young children. It will be implemented by Bovis with management by CDC / management co.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The LAP will be used by toddlers and young children. It will be implemented by Bovis with management by CDC / management co.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

Some homes open onto greensward

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11. Public and private spaces

Some homes open onto greensward

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11. Public and private spaces

The entrance to the home is well-defined to maintain privacy and security, as well as variety and visual interest.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The entrance to the home is well-defined to maintain privacy and security, as well as variety and visual interest.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The entrance to the home is well-defined to maintain privacy and security, as well as variety and visual interest.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The entrance to the home is well-defined to maintain privacy and security, as well as variety and visual interest.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The entrance to the home is well-defined to maintain privacy and security, as well as variety and visual interest.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The entrance to the home is well-defined to maintain privacy and security, as well as variety and visual interest.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The entrance to the home is well-defined to maintain privacy and security, as well as variety and visual interest.

Street & Home

11. Public and private spaces

The entrance to the home is well-defined to maintain privacy and security, as well as variety and visual interest.

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12. External storage and amenity space

Designated space for bins and bin collection points (BCP) are shown on the fence key plan. Each dwelling has space for 3 bins as per CDC requirements.

Street & Home

12. External storage and amenity space

Designated space for bins and bin collection points (BCP) are shown on the fence key plan. Each dwelling has space for 3 bins as per CDC requirements.

Street & Home

12. External storage and amenity space

Where dwellings have garages, these are oversized to accommodate cycles and other large items. Where dwellings do not have garages, sheds are provided for cycle / large item storage.

Where dwellings have garages, these are oversized to accommodate cycles and other large items. Where dwellings do not have garages, sheds are provided for cycle / large item storage.

Street & Home

12. External storage and amenity space

Where dwellings have garages, these are oversized to accommodate cycles and other large items. Where dwellings do not have garages, sheds are provided for cycle / large item storage.

Where dwellings have garages, these are oversized to accommodate cycles and other large items. Where dwellings do not have garages, sheds are provided for cycle / large item storage.

Street & Home

12. External storage and amenity space

Where dwellings do not have garages, sheds are provided for cycle / large item storage.

Where dwellings have garages, these are oversized to accommodate cycles and other large items. Where dwellings do not have garages, sheds are provided for cycle / large item storage.

Street & Home

12. External storage and amenity space

Where dwellings do not have garages, sheds are provided for cycle / large item storage.

Where dwellings have garages, these are oversized to accommodate cycles and other large items. Where dwellings do not have garages, sheds are provided for cycle / large item storage.

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